Seals, sharks and shipwrecks: 3D mapping the Lady Darling shipwreck

The Narooma Bar on a very calm day with Montague Island in the distance. Image: Lee Graham /ANMM.

The Narooma Bar on a very calm day with Montague Island in the distance. Image: Lee Graham / ANMM.

New South Wales hosts a wide variety of historic shipwreck sites. These range from large, fully exposed and intact hulls to smaller, largely disarticulated, dispersed, and buried structural components and artefacts. The environments in which these sites exist also differ significantly in terms of seabed composition, water depth and water clarity.

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Thinking ‘inside the box’: Exploring the UTS Micro-CSI lab

UTS Micro-CSI on site at the Australian National Maritime Museum. Image: Andrew Frolows, 2016 / ANMM.

UTS Micro-CSI on site at the Australian National Maritime Museum. Image: Andrew Frolows, 2016 / ANMM.

The UTS Micro-CSI, on site at the Australian National Maritime Museum during National Science Week

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the ‘invention’ of the shipping container. As a cornerstone of the global economy, the humble steel box has revolutionised the way we live in profound ways. From the food on our plates to our clothes and mobile phones, there are very few items today that don’t travel to us by sea.

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Using Twitter to provide virtual tours

Rough Medicine

Rough Medicine was used to experiment with virtual tours via social media.

The Australian National Maritime Museum Learning team and the NSW Department of Education have embraced the use of social media to communicate and share exhibition content with teachers.

ANMM Education logoLearning Systems logo

The Rough Medicine – Life and Death in the Age of Sail exhibition at the ANMM was shared online via Twitter through a series of live tweets containing photos, website links, video and 360° footage of the key objects on display. This content was then collated through Storify creating a long term re-usable resource for teachers to use in the classroom.

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Swashbuckling Science

Science is awesome. Image: Annalice Creighton / ANMM.

Science is awesome. Image: Annalice Creighton / ANMM.

Do you know a toddler who is bonkers for bubbles, mad about messy play, sweet on ships, or wild about water in all its shapes and forms? We thought we would use our monthly craft spot this August to share our top 5 maritime-y science-y activities for early learners as a way to celebrate National Science Week.

While in-depth discussions about the intricacies of animal adaptations, laws of motion and gravity or the molecular changes involved in a chemical reaction may be years away, enjoying science play and simple experiments with young children is still a fun and easy opportunity to foster their curiosity and problem solving skills.

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National Science Week 2016 at the Museum

Micro-CSI Lab: University of Technology Sydney (UTS). Image: UTS.

Micro-CSI Lab: University of Technology Sydney (UTS). Image: UTS.

The museum will be running a series of exciting science-themed events and programs to celebrate this year’s National Science Week.

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Watch out, seagulls, I’m on your case! An update from Bailey

You can see by the mess on the wharves that my job here is not yet done. Image: Andrew Frolows / ANMM.

You can see by the mess on the wharves that my job here is not yet done. Image: Andrew Frolows / ANMM.

Hi there!

After six weeks here, I’m settling into the job nicely but still learning and discovering new things.

My enemies, the seagulls, have started to notice that I’m here to stay, and there aren’t as many as there used to be. When I started we had seagulls everywhere on the wharves, but now we have maybe five at a time. Those birds who’ve decided to stay have learnt to sit up on the vessels, out of my reach. Sooo frustrating!

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Meanderings in the Murk: Diving on the wreck of the Centennial

ANMM Shipwright and diver Lee Graham inspects a collapsed iron frame on the Centennial site that has been colonised by sponges. Image: James Hunter / ANMM.

ANMM Shipwright and diver Lee Graham inspects a collapsed iron frame on the Centennial site that has been colonised by sponges. Image: James Hunter / ANMM.

The museum’s maritime archaeology team recently visited the shipwreck site of the late nineteenth century steamship Centennial. The dive was part of an ongoing initiative to document selected historic shipwreck sites within Sydney Harbour with digital photography and videography. Still images and video footage collected during the project will be used to generate 3D digital photo-mosaics of these sites and test the usefulness of this recording method in a variety of environments.

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Museums Australasia Conference 2016: Two perspectives

EMP Conference, courtesy Museums Galleries Queensland.

EMP Conference, courtesy Museums Galleries Queensland.

This year for the first time, the museum offered conference bursaries for the Museums Australasia 2016 conference Facing the Future: local, global and Pacific possibilities – the first joint conference of Museums Australia and Museums Aotearoa.

Two applicants were successful and here are their thoughts on the conference.

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Of ships, stones and graves

Viking boat prows, Roskilde, Denmark

Viking boat prows, Roskilde Vikingeskibsmuseet, Denmark

This is part of a series by Curator Dr Stephen Gapps who received an Endeavour Executive Fellowship from April to July 2016. Stephen is based at the Swedish History Museum and the National Maritime Museum (including the Vasa Museum) in Stockholm, Sweden. He is working on several Viking Age and other maritime history and archaeology related projects.

This is the last note in this series of Viking ‘journeys’. After nearly three months in Stockholm, it was time to see some of the famous museums, burial sites and stone arrangements across Scandinavia. And some not so famous.

First stop was the island of Birka for a sail on Aifur, the reconstructed Viking Age vessel that travelled by sail, by oars on rivers and overland on wheels from the Baltic to the Caspian Sea in the 1990s. It was one of several important journeys of historical reconstruction that make it beyond doubt the Vikings could have travelled so far to the east.

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Boats in Sulawesi: An illustrated journey

Fishing port, Ampana. Image: Richard Gregory.

Fishing port, Ampana. Image: Richard Gregory.

A glimpse of some traditional boats: Fifty-six days in Sulawesi, Indonesia, 2015 

This visit began in Manado at the northern tip of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi and included a ferry journey from Gorontalo to Ampana via the Togean Islands, a week’s stay in Tentena on the shores of Lake Poso, three weeks in the Toraja highlands, a few days in Makassar and four days at Bira Beach on the southern tip of Sulawesi.

Throughout much of the journey I rendered many drawings directly from life and they include a number of studies of traditional boats. It’s these images that I wish to share along with these notes about boatbuilding in Sulawesi, and its wider context.

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Introducing Bailey Haggarty – Assistant Director, Seagulls

Hi! I'm Bailey. Image: Bailey / ANMM.

Hi! I’m Bailey.

Hi there!

I’ve been at the museum for four weeks now, so it’s about time I introduced myself. I’m new here in many ways – as well as being a recent employee, I’m the first one who’s a dog.

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The life of a lighthouse keeper

Goode Island lighthouse c.1909. Although officially unidentified, this family group is likely the Norgates as they were still the keepers on Goode Island until January 1910. Image: State Library of Queensland.

Goods Island lighthouse c 1909. Image: State Library of Queensland.

The life of a lighthouse keeper is often either romanticised or seen as a desolate life for those who prefer the solitary confines of the role, away from the social rigours of mainland life.

In reality, the life was a mixture of both and so much more. The ANMM has in its collection an extraordinary log book kept by the lighthouse keeper William Norgate from November 1893 to November 1929. The log is dilapidated and fragile but reveals a humble yet extraordinary life.

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Treasures of the American Collection

European, American and Australian ships used Hong Kong as a centre of trade in the 19th century. This painting depicts the American vessel S.R. BEARSE as it enters Hong Kong Harbour with fully rigged sails. ANMM Collection 00005647.

European, American and Australian ships used Hong Kong as a centre of trade in the 19th century. This painting depicts the American vessel S.R. BEARSE as it enters Hong Kong Harbour with fully rigged sails. ANMM Collection 00005647.

Where else can you see a President’s signature (Abraham Lincoln), a Queen’s signature (Victoria R), rare books and etchings, and a seventy-year-old gardenia in one place – but in the USA Gallery of the museum!

These are just a few of the objects from the multi-million dollar collection of paintings, models and artefacts we’ve compiled from the museum’s American collection to represent more than 200 years of the close maritime connection between the seafaring nations of the USA and Australia.

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Look to the horizon: Why latitude was easier to find than longitude

'Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude' traces the history of finding reliable methods for determining your longitude at sea. Image: ANMM.

‘Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude’ traces the history of finding reliable methods for determining your longitude at sea. Image: ANMM.

Ships, Clocks and Stars: the Quest for Longitude tells the amazing story of how the problem of determining longitude at sea was solved. The exhibition explains the rival methods and shows the incredible craftsmanship and ingenuity of clockmaker John Harrison, whose timepieces finally gave sailors a practical means to calculate their longitude in a simple manner.

Why was it so hard to sort out a means of finding longitude, when it seems finding latitude had been a relatively simple process?

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How to make a mini planetarium

Star light, star bright, first constellation I see tonight...

Star light, star bright, first constellation I see tonight…

There’s almost no end to the fun that can be had when kids have torches in their hands. Shadow play, bedroom projections, reading under the covers after lights out, spooky face stories, or… a handheld miniature planetarium.

This month we’ve been inspired by current exhibitions Ships Clocks and Stars, as well as our upcoming school holiday program, to make a nifty little star gazer out of some everyday items for our kids craft spot. This mini-planetarium is perfect for projecting under the covers, onto bedroom walls or with evening story time. More than just a toy, it’s also a great way to learn to identify constellations in the night sky.

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