Applications for MMAPSS 2016-2017 grants now open

2014 MMAPSS grant recipients Museums Australia mid North Coast Chapter Waterways. The grant funded conservation projects for five smaller museums.

2014 MMAPSS grant recipients Museums Australia mid North Coast Chapter
Waterways.

Applications are now open for the 2016–2017 round of the Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPPS), with applications closing on 31 March 2016. Check the website for more details on how to apply.

In recognition that much of Australia’s maritime heritage exists in regional organisations outside the major collecting institutions, the museum is committed to providing outreach support. We are proud to administer this national outreach program, awarding grants annually, of up to $10,000 each, and supporting internships so that regional organisations can continue to care for, conserve, preserve, interpret and display Australia’s maritime heritage.

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Scrimshaw: A Whaler’s Pastime

The other day, I was walking through the Museum’s stores, when a strange object caught my eye: a neatly framed pair of odd looking dolls with very puffed up hair, which reminded me of the very elaborate 1980s hairstyles like the one Joan Collins wore on her Dynasty days.

Whale bone and human hair dolls. ANMM collection 00018316

Whale bone and human hair dolls.  ANMM collection 000018316

These dolls are part of the Museum’s scrimshaw collection. Scrimshaw are objects created by whalers from the by-product of the whale, such as bones, teeth, baleen and bones. It was first done by sailors working on whaling ships out of the coast of New England between 1745 and 1759 until the moratorium of commercial whaling in 1986.

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Endeavour: Geelong to Adelaide Voyage, day 2

HMB Endeavour on the way to Cape Otway

A blog series by Steward Bill Ellemor from on board the Australian National Maritime Museum’s HMB Endeavour replica as it sails from Geelong to Adelaide. See our Sail the Endeavour page to learn more about joining voyages like this.

Day Two, Wednesday 10 February 2016

As dawn broke we could see the Airey’s Inlet lighthouse and nearby Lorne. A little later evidence of the recent Otway bushfire could also be seen along the Great Ocean Road coast. As lunchtime approached, the Cape Otway lighthouse came into view; we passed it at about 1230. It seemed a lazy sort of afternoon—sunny and pleasant, gently pitching over a long swell—with no sail handling to do so light duties all round. Many caught up on some sleep. Finally, however, at around 1930 the engines were powered down and by 2000 we were at last under sail. Everyone breathed a sigh. Ahhh!

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Would you have survived being sick on the high seas?

A trip to the ship's surgeon was a dangerous one on the high seas.

The Ship’s Surgeon was a vital crew member, tasked with looking after the health of all aboard the cramped sailing ships.

Being sea sick was a dire matter in the golden age of sail. Rough Medicine: Life and Death in the Age of Sail explores the world of the ship’s surgeon and his grizzly tools of the trade. From a queasy stomach to amputated limbs and spoiled food, life aboard a 17th century sailing ship was far from pleasant.

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Endeavour: Geelong to Adelaide, day 1

Farewell Geelong

Farewell Geelong

A blog series by Steward Bill Ellemor from on board the Australian National Maritime Museum’s HMB Endeavour replica as it sails from Sydney to Geelong. See our Sail the Endeavour page to learn more about joining voyages like this.

Day One, Tuesday 9 February 2016

Once again, to sea! Our new voyage crew and supernumeraries came on board at 0800, stowed their gear and a new round of briefing and training began. Shortly before 1000 the first of our pilots came aboard. His task was soon finished as we travelled a short distance off the pier and anchored again—in pretty much the same place where we spent last Thursday night.

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A Brighter Future: The Second Annual Women and Science Symposium

In celebration of International Women’s Day on 8th March 2016, the Australian National Maritime Museum will host our second annual Women and Science Symposium for high school students.

Women in Science Symposium 2015

Women in Science Symposium 2015

It all started with a discussion with my daughter, about the number of girls opting out of studying science because of negative stereotypes. She said it was such a shame that girls were not considering science as a worthwhile option to study. As an environmental scientist, she knows that those girls are locking themselves out of some amazing careers.

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Pieces of Eight and a Parrot Pinata

finsihed piñata

It’s almost unavoidable, if you have small children in your world, at some point they will probably ask for a pirate party. There’s something irresistible about those tricorn wearing terrible thugs that no amount of education on the truly Horrible Histories of Pirates can overcome.

I once made the mistake of festooning a 3 year old’s pirate birthday with my favourite  skull and cross bones cardboard bunting and the adorable Pete the repeat parrot, not anticipating the swashbuckling scoundrel-like behaviour that would ensue once the face paint eye patches and paper pirate hats began to encourage a little too much role play.

Needless to say Pete was minus a head and an arm after being thrown off the “pirate ship” (read cubby house/swing/ nearby tree) a few times. Never to flap his awkward mechanical arms and chirp again.

This month’s craft spot is inspired by our Horrible Histories Pirates exhibition ( after all Golden age Pirates really did have parrots and other exotic animals, stolen ones of course, to fetch a pretty penny) and pirate parties, and pirate-like toddler behaviour perhaps. It’s a parrot piñata- something you beat up to steal all its goodies, sounds like piratical mischief to me. Fringing onto an adhesive base is also a great craft for with older toddlers and young children as it’s easy, glue free and a good opportunity to practice some fine motor skills with layering, tearing, cutting and collage.

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Endeavour: Sydney to Geelong Voyage, days 8–9

Aloft on HMB Endeavour

A blog series by Steward Bill Ellemor from on board the Australian National Maritime Museum’s HMB Endeavour replica as it sails from Sydney to Geelong. See our Sail the Endeavour page to learn more about joining voyages like this.

Day Eight, Thursday 4 February 2016

Our final night in open sea was a somewhat bouncy one as we ambled around south of Port Phillip Heads keeping away from other vessels, but generally making sure we were in position to advance to pilot meeting area on time in the morning. As we approached, the local population of dolphins turned out in force for a friendly welcome. The sea was a little too rough for boarding so the pilot boat escorted us until we were inside the Heads. Our pilot, Neil, boarded between Point Lonsdale and Queenscliff and remained with us all the way to Geelong. He thoroughly enjoyed the experience of piloting a vessel so different from those of his daily round.

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Book review – In All Respects Ready: Australia’s Navy in World War One

ANMM curator Dr Stephen Gapps reviews In All Respects ready: Australia’s Navy in World War One by Dr David Stevensthe winner of the 2015 Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Book Prize. 

TIn all respects ready 9780195578584[1]he title of In all Respects Ready is taken from a 1919 assessment by the British Admiralty of the record of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in World War I:

Their Lordships state that Australia may well feel pride in the record of its navy newly created in the years prior to 1914, but shown by the test of war to be in all respects ready to render invaluable service to the Empire in the hour of need.

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Endeavour: Sydney to Geelong Voyage, day 7

On board Endeavour on its way to Geelong, 2016

A blog series by Steward Bill Ellemor from on board the Australian National Maritime Museum’s HMB Endeavour replica as it sails from Sydney to Geelong. See our Sail the Endeavour page to learn more about joining voyages like this.

Day seven, Wednesday 3 February 2016

The south westerly change came through at around 0500, and everyone had to adjust clothing to varying degrees to cope with the much cooler conditions. During the morning the wind went southerly and strengthened, increasing the effect. Wet weather gear was common on deck, not so much to keep rain off—there was very little—but to keep out the cold. Victorians shrugged their shoulders; those from north of the border grumbled about Victorian weather. Why wouldn’t they? These conditions made the Captain’s morning briefing a more challenging experience. By nightfall we could see Cape Schank as we tossed around in an increasing swell. Maybe an uncomfortable night ahead.

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