Throwback Thursday: American troopship convoy departs for Australia 1942

Wartime: SS Mariposa in Sydney, unloading an aircraft. ANMM Collection 00035944.

Wartime: SS Mariposa in Sydney, unloading an aircraft. ANMM Collection 00035944.

SS Mariposa was launched in 1931 by the Matson Line to carry 700 passengers in luxury across the Pacific from San Francisco to Sydney. Stripped down to carry up to 5000 personnel, Mariposa was one of the minor ‘monsters’ of the Allied troopship fleet during World War II. The world’s biggest ocean liners, nicknamed ‘the monsters’ were requisitioned to transport troops and materiel because they could outrun most enemy ships and submarines and therefore needed fewer naval escorts as they sailed around the world.

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An Australian Stonehenge?

Eel trap

A traditional Aboriginal woven eel trap made by Yvonne Koolmatrie in 1991. The trap is made from a bundle of sedge reed stems coiled with a loop stitch. Yvonne Koolmatrie is from the Ngarrindjeri community in South Australia. Traps such as these were used in conjunction with complex stone arrangements. Reproduced courtesy of Yvonne Koolmatrie ANMM Collection 00015871

 

Traditional owners will find out next month if their push for a 6,000-year-old network of eel traps in south-west Victoria is to be supported for inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The eel-farms were built by the Gunditjmara people in south west Victoria to manage eels in Lake Condah and nearby Darlot Creek. They are among the earliest surviving examples of aquaculture in the world.

The eel farms cover more than 75 square kilometres and include artificial channels and ponds for separating eels, as well as smoking trees for preserving the eels for export to other parts of Australia. Just to be clear, this industry and the complex of stone arrangements including houses began around 6,000 years ago – before Stonehenge and the Pyramids.

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Ken Warby and life lessons

SPIRIT OF AUSTRALIA driven by Ken Warby on Blowering Dam. ANMM Collection ANMS1163[291], courtesy of Graeme Andrews.

SPIRIT OF AUSTRALIA driven by Ken Warby on Blowering Dam. ANMM Collection ANMS1163[291], courtesy of Graeme Andrews.

Museums are truly wondrous places. Reminding us all where we have come from. Our shared history and what humans have experienced. I have always been constantly inspired by these stories but I now find myself using them as life lessons to be held up during moments of parental pressure. Continue reading

Put a tour guide in your pocket with our new visitor app

The museum visitor app, available for iOS and Android. Image: ANMM.

The museum visitor app, available for iOS and Android. Image: ANMM.

Enrich your visit to the museum with our new Visitor App. Built for iOS and Android, the App features seven themed self-guided audio tours, six highlight tours as well as great photos, event and exhibition info, maps and amenities.

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The lost art of the Christmas card

Not quite at the water's edge, yet. This 1865 depiction of colonists at Manly celebrating Christmas appeared in The Illustrated Sydney News. Image: ANMM collection 00006061.

Not quite at the water’s edge, yet. This 1865 depiction of colonists at Manly celebrating Christmas appeared in The Illustrated Sydney News. Image: ANMM collection 00006061.

It was bound to happen. There was only one this year: a lone Christmas card arriving in my mailbox, stoically spreading Christmas cheer and best wishes for the season. Likely, next year there will be none and although we may discover new ways to spread cheer, via emails or seasonal emojis, but for me, the demise of the Christmas card is cause for some lament.

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A Polish ship, British children and caring Sydneysiders captured in concrete

This memorial to British children evacuated to Australia in 1940 also commemorates the local women who looked after them at Sydney's Quarantine Station. Image: Ursula K Frederick, Sydney Harbour National Park.

This memorial to British children evacuated to Australia in 1940 also commemorates the local women who looked after them at Sydney’s Quarantine Station. Image: Ursula K Frederick, Sydney Harbour National Park.

The Polish passenger liner MV Batory seems an odd ship to be commemorated at Sydney’s North Head Quarantine Station, as it never moored there. Yet its presence is captured in concrete: ‘BRITISH EVACUEE / CHILDREN / ARRIVED 16TH OCTOBER / 1940. M.S. BATORY / VA + DS’, followed by 37 names etched into four neat panels.

In fact, despite outbreaks of influenza, measles and ‘school sores’, the Batory was never quarantined. Rather, for the British children it rushed to Sydney in 1940, North Head represented a safe haven from German bombers and invasion scares.

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BIG IS BETTER: ‘Ovation of the Seas’ comes to Australia.

No help needed. Image: David Payne / ANMM.

No help needed. Image: David Payne / ANMM.

Big is best,
Big wins
Big is like – OMG – gigantic
Big is beautiful!

Look what’s outside my hotel window in Hobart: Ovation of the Seasone of the biggest ocean cruise ships in the world. It’s here, you can’t miss it, it seems longer than the docks, wider than the widest sea, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound – anything goes in this department.

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Redfern to Hobart: Tribal Warrior crew to make history

The Tribal Warrior crew practicing for the Sydney to Hobart Race. Photo courtesy Daniel Daley.

Some of the Tribal Warrior crew practising for the Sydney to Hobart Race. Photo courtesy Daniel Daley.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have thousands of years of maritime history. More recently, Saltwater people were prominent in early colonial Australian voyages, such as Bungaree, the first Australian to circumnavigate Australia, with Matthew Flinders in 1802-3. Now, a crew from Sydney and south coast New South Wales are attempting to make history as the first Indigenous crew to enter the Sydney to Hobart yacht race.

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Waves of history: Inspecting a historic surf craft in Tathra

The historic surf craft is housed on a heritage wharf at Tathra. Image: David Payne / ANMM.

Inspecting a historic surf craft housed on a heritage wharf at Tathra. Image: David Payne / ANMM.

Another MMAPSS vessel inspection has just been completed by the museum’s Historic Vessels curator David Payne. Down at Tathra on the NSW south coast of NSW is an early example of a surf craft, and perhaps the first surfboat used by the Tathra Surf Club. David flew down and spent a day going over the craft and delving into its history at the Pig & Whistle Line Museum.

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Bailey announces his first exhibition: ‘Dogs and Cats All at Sea’

Bailey, getting his paws into curating. Image: Andrew Frolows / ANMM.

Bailey, getting his paws into curating. Image: Andrew Frolows / ANMM.

Hi there!

When I first came to the museum, people kept calling me a ‘salty sea dog’. I thought they meant it literally, as I sometimes fall in the harbour when I chase seagulls too enthusiastically – but no! A salty sea dog, it turns out, is someone who spends a lot of time on the water, not in it.

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Tobruk: The lifting of the siege, 75 years ago

HMAS Waterhen in Sydney Harbour, c1925–33. ANMM Collection 00021576.

HMAS Waterhen in Sydney Harbour, c1925–33. ANMM Collection 00021576.

The 9th of December 2016 is the 75th anniversary of the lifting of the siege of Tobruk, the port on the north coast of Libya that proved such a thorn in the side of German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel during the eight months that the siege lasted. The Australian War Memorial describes it as one of the longest sieges in British military history.

Whenever the siege of Tobruk is remembered, the Australian soldiers, who formed the greater part of the garrison for most of the time, are quite rightly afforded pride of place.

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$5,000 maritime history prizes – enter now!

The museum's 2017 history prizes are now open. Image: ANMM Collection 00020725.

The museum’s 2017 history prizes are now open. Image: ANMM Collection 00020725.

Writers, publishers and readers of maritime history are invited to nominate works for maritime history prizes totalling $5,000, sponsored jointly by the Australian Association for Maritime History and the Australian National Maritime Museum. Nominations for the next round close on 28 April 2017.

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The Voyage game: One year on

The Voyage, an online game exploring the convict experience. Image: ANMM.

The Voyage, an online game exploring the convict experience. Image: ANMM.

On 30 November 2015 the museum launched our new educational game, The Voyage, at the Tasmanian Museum and Gallery in Hobart.The Voyage is a ‘serious’ game based on the transportation of convicts from Britain to Van Diemen’s Land in the early nineteenth century. The game is a joint venture with Roar Film Tasmania, The Australian National Maritime Museum, University of Tasmania, Screen Tasmania and Screen Australia.

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Wild Ocean Woman: Kay Cottee’s ‘First Lady’

Steering - by foot - across the Pacific Ocean. ANMM Collection, reproduced courtesy Kay Cottee.

Steering – by foot – across the Pacific Ocean. ANMM Collection, reproduced courtesy Kay Cottee.

Imagine being thrown about in your small yacht surfing down a 20-metre wave. You’re in the Southern Indian Ocean, it’s freezing, you’re exhausted and soaked through. You’re days or weeks from land. You have no GPS. You’re alone.

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Pete O’Sullivan: A life of motorcycles, cars, swimwear and cattle

Beachgoers at Newcastle, c1910. This period saw Australians embrace swimming at the beach for leisure. ANMM Collection ANMS0551[041].

Beachgoers at Newcastle, c1910. This period saw Australians embrace swimming at the beach for leisure. ANMM Collection ANMS0551[041].

In this island country, the coastline stretches over a distance of more than 36,000 kilometres, so it’s no surprise that Australians are obsessed with water, beaches and water sports. It is this obsession with water that has contributed to Australia’s reputation as a nation of swimmers, surfers and beach goers.  With the introduction of paid holidays and leisure time for families, Australians crowded the beaches making them the place to be. Continue reading