A ringing success: Kenn Reefs expedition, days 7 and 8

Lee Graham and his trusty tow-board. Image: Julia Sumerling/Silentworld Foundation.

Lee Graham and his trusty tow-board. Image: Julia Sumerling/Silentworld Foundation.

While the dive team was busy documenting sites KR10 and KR11 on the morning and afternoon of 14 January, the magnetometer team took advantage of the calm weather and sea conditions to run a survey along the outside of the entire Kenn Reefs system. The first area surveyed was along the outside fringe of the ‘foot and ankle’, with specific emphasis placed on detecting offshore components of known shipwreck sites (such as KR1, KR2 and KR4). Because sea conditions were calm, the team also ‘deployed’ Lee on a tow-board behind the magnetometer.

The tow-board (also known as a ‘Manta-board’) is a flat, hydrodynamic-shaped board with handles that is connected to a towing vessel with a length of line. The person using the tow-board grips the handles, is pulled through the water at low speed, and can visually search the seabed for shipwreck material. Most tow-boards are designed so that their users can turn, dive and ascend through the water column at will, simply by changing its orientation with the handles. Lee was positioned 10 metres behind the magnetometer in the hope he might be able to visually spot and identify any anomalies it detected.

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Finding ‘Hope’ with a magnetometer: Kenn Reefs expedition, days 6 and 7

Pete Illidge and Renee Malliaros prove that site mapping and synchronised swimming are not mutually exclusive tasks. Image: Julia Sumerling/Silentworld Foundation.

Pete Illidge and Renee Malliaros prove that site mapping and synchronised swimming are not mutually exclusive tasks. Image: Julia Sumerling/Silentworld Foundation.

One of the major goals of the Kenn Reefs expedition was to find Hope, the small cutter built from material salvaged from Bona Vista, and later lost during the rescue of the brig’s crew. According to historical accounts, two boats were sent from the rescuing vessel (the ship Asia) to Observatory Cay, where they recovered most of Bona Vista’s crew, the brig’s allocation of specie (gold and silver coin brought aboard Bona Vista for trading purposes), and brought them aboard Asia. A skeleton crew of thirteen and the personal belongings of all of the brig’s officers and men remained aboard Hope, as did unspecified salvaged goods valued at £1,000. However, as Asia got underway and took Hope under tow, tragedy struck:

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Frederick Reef Archaeological Survey – Day 6

Mon, 9 Jan 2012

I was up early today at 5.45 am.  Some people are starting to get up with the sun!

My team was assigned the task of doing a manta board survey from the coral cay, west as far as we could go; and then, from the reef break to the south. We were out from 8.30 am until midday.

Conducting a manta board survey at sea

Photographer: Xanthe Rivett

During that time we found two pieces of timber, possibly from the shipwreck, in the deep water of the lagoon. West of the cay we found another pulley sheave, but without the bronze coak, and an unidentified assemblage of iron and timber. 

In the afternoon we headed out to get an overall picture of the finds that have been discovered over the last four days.

Timber from shipwreck at sea floor

Photographer: Xanthe Rivett

Here are a few photos of the day…

Cheers,
Paul Hundley  (Sr. Curator and archaeologist)

Snorkel team on inflatable boat

First snorkel team heading out for the morning. Photographer: Xanthe Rivett

Free diver under water

Free diving on an anomaly while on the manta board survey. Photographer: Xanthe Rivett

Underwater reflection of coral reef

The water was so clear and reflects the sea bottom like a mirror. Photographer: Xanthe Rivett